New Sons of Anarchy Spin-off

image

Sons of Anarchy Spinoff Gets Official Title, New Writer.

FX is revving up its Mayans-centric Sons of Anarchy spinoff.
The cabler announced Wednesday that SOA creator Kurt Sutter has handpicked up-and-coming writer Elgin James to pen the pilot for the potential series, which has been titled Mayans MC. Sutter will be credited as a co-creator alongside James.

FX, meanwhile, calls Mayans MC “a dark, visceral family drama that takes a new look at the most American of icons, the 1% outlaw, this time, reflected through a Latino lens.”
On his decision to hire James, whose most notable credit is the 2012 indie Little Birds, Sutter said in a statement, “I wanted to find a strong, unique Latino voice. Because I didn’t think a white guy from Jersey should be writing about Latin culture and traditions. Elgin is that voice.” Elgin is next set to direct the film adaptation of A Million Little Pieces.

Sons of Anarchy ended its seven-season run in 2014. Sutter’s 2015 FX follow-up, The Bastard Executioner, failed to match SOA‘s success and was subsequently cancelled after just one season.

Advertisements

Shifting the Balance of Power

Why More Women are Riding Motorcycles and How That’s Driving Change

Whether it’s for freedom, adventure, spiritual experience, confidence, independence, or community, women are taking to motorcycles with an increased voracity.

Three years ago, Debra Teplitz, 44, decided to silence the voice in her head that said, “Nice Jewish girls from the North Shore of Chicago don’t ride motorcycles.” Like so many women who are learning to ride in their 30s, 40s, 50s, and beyond, Teplitz has confronted personal challenges, societal stereotypes, and cultural expectations to embrace the freedom and independence of motorcycling. For many female riders, mastering a motorcycle has served as a catalyst for other long-awaited life changes. While their riding is at an all-time high, women on motorcycles are nothing new. We’ve been riding longer than we’ve been voting. Nonetheless, there are a lot more of us now. Women are one of the fastest growing demographics in the powersports industry.

Why Women Ride: The Faces of Female Motorcycling

Freedom

After her divorce in 2007, Wendy Lamparelli, 51, was ready to buy a bike to fulfill a lifelong dream. Fearing for her safety, Lamparelli’s mom and kids begged her not to, so she ended up with a convertible instead. But the dream didn’t fade. In June 2012, she made it come true. What does she enjoy most? “The freedom and the pure adrenaline rush I feel when I’m in control of such a beautiful machine,” she says.

Teplitz, editorial operations manager for a multinational publishing house, loved riding with her dad. Even as a child, she felt free and relished the special time spent with him. Years later, while watching her husband learn to ride, she was bitten by the bug. In spite of being terrified of her klutziness, Teplitz signed up, too. She recalls being so tense that her body still ached two days after class. In spite of stressing over learning to shift, dropping the bike, and picking up speed, she passed her test on the first try.

Independence

Now 55, Idaho tourism manager Diane Norton started riding 14 years ago because she wanted the independence and a better view than the back of a helmet. She loves riding through Idaho’s scenic back roads alongside her husband. “It’s my Zen,” Norton says. “I’m completely in the moment. There’s no cell phone, music, or email that can take me away from my Zen.”

Adventure

Account manager Kelly Geissler, 46, always wanted to ride but never thought her husband was interested. Kids and careers took precedence and riding remained something for another day. That day finally arrived for both of them four years ago. Geissler hasn’t looked back since – except to check her mirrors.

To Conquer Fears

Three years ago, 46-year-old Christine Watson, learned to ride when her new husband decided he wanted to ride solo again. It was learn to ride, or see him less. The fear was almost paralyzing, but she overcame it and now wonders what took her so long. “I started on a Honda CBR 250, moved up to a 600, and now I’m on a Ninja 1000,” she says. “Riding’s been the driving force behind life changes. I now know I can do anything I set my mind to.”

Her excitement and drive hasn’t gone unnoticed. Christine’s 20-year-old daughter thinks her mom is cool to try new things and conquer fears. “I think it’s important for people to know you can do anything, no matter what your age,” Watson says.

Community

While riding is often about independence, riders appreciate the community aspect. “It’s given me a sisterhood with a group of women that has changed my life,” Watson says.

Speed Bumps and Traffic Cones: Obstacles to Riding

At the age of 16 (which is when I first learned to ride) most of us feel invincible and immortal – so it’s easy to learn. There’s no fear. Learning as an adult, however, is a whole different ball game. There’s an established stigma. Before you can learn, you have to get past myths based on:

  • Cultural training
  • Opinions of others
  • Physical requirements
  • Fear of failure
  • Fear of success

There are also skill-based fears, remedied through training and practice:

  • Operating the clutch
  • Turning at slow speeds
  • Picking up speed
  • Cornering
  • Dropping it
  • Finding others to ride with

Geissler’s biggest challenge was to get that little voice out of her head that said, “Why are you doing this? It’s dangerous!” As her time in the saddle increased, so too did her confidence, and that little voice isn’t even a whisper any more. “It’s cliché to say it’s freedom, but that’s as close as I can get,” she says. “It’s the ‘don’t fence me in’ spirit. It’s so beautiful and I can’t help but say a little prayer of gratitude. I’m always grinning.”

A Sisterhood of Riders

“With women’s affinity toward connection, it’s only natural these riders want to connect with each other,” says Genevieve Schmitt, founder and editor of Women Riders Now, the longest-running and most comprehensive resource for female motorcyclists. “As a result there are hundreds of women’s motorcycle riding clubs across the U.S. and Canada,” she says. These clubs provide an outlet for women to meet up on a regular basis and share their passion for motorcycling. “It’s also a way for new riders to get integrated into a community of like-minded riders,” Schmitt says.

One of those organizations is Women On Wheels (WOW). By day, WOW president Cris Baldwin is the assistant dean and registrar for the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis. But she devotes most nights and weekends to the not-for-profit organization. WOW has 75 Chapters in the U.S. and approximately 1,500 members worldwide. “This already gives me a network of females not accessible to me prior to WOW,” Baldwin says.

Women Take the Industry By Storm

Most telling of women’s impact on a still male-dominated arena is their entry into leadership positions in the powersports industry.

In February 2013, Maggie McNally-Bradshaw, an IT Specialist for New York State, was unanimously elected chair of theAmerican Motorcyclist Association (AMA) board of directors. She is the first woman to lead the AMA board in the association’s 89-year history.

McNally-Bradshaw is used to defying the odds. It was her feistiness and pure determination that got her riding at 19. She and a group of friends were talking about dream cars. When 5’1” McNally-Bradshaw said she wanted to get a motorcycle, one of the guys said, “You can’t. Girls don’t ride motorcycles.” She had her permit within a week, and now teaches part-time.

Sarah Schilke, Head of Marketing and PR for Schuberth North America and Held USA, became the first woman to serve on the Board of Directors of the Motorcycle Industry Council (MIC) in its 100-year history. An avid street rider and amateur off-road racer, Schilke has been riding motorcycles for 20 years and worked in the motorcycle field for almost as long.

Like many women, Cam Arnold – MIC’s VP of Communications – learned how to ride from her college boyfriend. She enjoyed it, and bought a bike, which became her main form of transportation for years. A couple of close calls spooked her and she sold her bike to a friend, whom she later married. She had her bike back! Also typical of many women’s stories, Arnold took a break while focusing on family and career. She and her husband returned to riding once the kids were grown, and don’t plan on stopping any time soon.

In a move that’s a huge boost for women riders, PowerLily, a private LinkedIn group for women in the powersports industry (with more than 300 active members), recently became part of the MIC. Arnold will lead the program and work closely with its members to integrate MIC resources. “We’ll have support from all segments of the industry,” she says.

Industry leader Harley-Davidson has been pursuing women riders for years, with programs such as the Garage Party, designed to take the intimidation factor out of walking into a motorcycle shop. Their strategy worked. Harley-Davidsonsold more new on-road motorcycles to women in the U.S. than all other brands combined in 2013. Perhaps more women have realized the benefits of riding that can extend to daily lives off the road. “Thousands of women have found riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle is a powerful way to tap into their strength, independence, and confidence and take it to a whole new level,” said Claudia Garber, Director of Market Outreach for Harley-Davidson.

Honda has doubled its market share of female riders in the past five years by focusing on a proper fit for women riders. The broad appeal of the CTX700 and CTX700N cruisers with their lower seat height, lower center of gravity, and optional automatic transmission is evident with more than 30 percent of sales to women. Honda has also introduced lower and narrower seats on sport bikes, a move that has helped double the percentage of sales to women in that segment.

“I’ve also noticed a shift in more women seeking the adventure style of riding with an eye toward long distance touring on two wheels,” says Schmitt. The adventure touring motorcycle market has taken off in recent years; all the new models to choose allow riders more versatility for touring. Women are seeking out this style of riding and enjoying all the rewards that come from venturing outside of a set comfort zone and exploring new horizons, Schmitt explains.

Women on motorcycles are powerful. And they’re learning that if you can master your motorcycle, you can master anything. Transformation that begins with one inspires many more who are ready to make a change, with an established community waiting to welcome and provide support.

As women riders’ numbers and strength swell, so too does their positive influence, both in the powersports industry and in the organizations in which they work and play.

Source: Fix.com

Easyriders 2015 Bike Show Tour – Long Beach, CA – V-Twin Life

If you plan on attending a show to kick off your 2015, then there is nothing better than the Easyriders Bike Tour!  For more details on full schedule click here http://www.easyridersevents.com/.

SATURDAY JANUARY 10, 2015
LONG BEACH, CA

Location:
Long Beach Convention Center
Halls B & C
300 E. Ocean Blvd.
Long Beach, CA 90802
ADMISSION Adults: $20.00
Admission Kids:
Ages 6-12: $10.00
Ages 5 & Younger: Free

Host HOTEL:
Hilton Long Beach
701 West Ocean Blvd.
Long Beach, CA 90831
Ph (562) 983-3400

FEATURES

Sons Of Anarchy Star Tommy Flanagan “Chibs”
– VIP Meet & Greet
– General Public Autograph/Photo Session

Event DATE: Saturday January 10, 2015
Show Hours: 10am-7pm
TICKETS: Sold at door the day of the show

Biker Battleground Phoenix
Meet the stars of Biker Battleground Phoenix
John Shoppe & Paul Yaffe

Meet The World’s Top Bike Builders

The Purrfect Angelz
Check out the Purrfect Angelz from
NBC’s “America’s Got Talent”, performing live!

The Industry’s Top Vendors Showing Off All The Industry’s Latest Products

Dave Mann Original Art Display

Don’t Miss Hot New Announcer Lisa Ligon

Exciting All New Bike Show Classes
Compete for one of 40 custom Bike Show trophies and major bragging rights! Get your bike featured in Easyriders, V-Twin, Wrench or Road Iron magazines!

***New Location***
$5 Bike Parking

 

Progressive International Motorcycle Show – V-Twin Life

How time flies when you’re having fun.  It’s that time again for the Progressive International Motorcycle Show to start revving there engines.  Dates are set and every year this show keeps growing and getting better and better.  If you’re in the hunt for a new bike or even want to test ride the new 2015 bikes then it’s time to get down to the Progressive International Motorcycle show.  Raise your motorcycle IQ down at the main stage where over two dozen free seminars are held by industry leaders and celebrity bikers.  For the custom lover check out the talent that comes here from all over for the J & P Cycles build off that is  top notch.  The custom rides never cease to amaze me and the competition is stiff.  From old school cool to the newest technologies one can incorporate into a build is a phenomenal site.  There is always tons of vendors showing their latest gadgets and clothing available for purchase.  If you need anything they probably have it!

Parking is easy when you ride in all cagers (cars) will have to park further out.  One cool thing is the free gear check in area for all your helmets and jackets that way you can be worry free and ready to hang out.

The event we will be covering is the Long Beach show which runs Friday November 14th through the Sunday November 16th.  For more event details or to purchase tickets near you click on the link below.

www.motorcycleshows.com/content/buy-tickets

The Progressive® International Motorcycle Shows® have partnered with a local dealership in your area to bring you a night fueled by community, great entertainment and a genuine love for riding motorcycles. Join us in the fun, ride out from your local dealership to a private screening of the film Why We Ride, and get the scoop on what’s to come for your city’s next Progressive International Motorcycle Show.

Featuring the world’s leading customized bikes and offering the largest prize purse of any builder competition on earth, the Ultimate Builder Custom Bike Show Presented by J&P Cycles offers you direct access to the foremost custom competition on the planet. Check out jaw-dropping designs, unbelievably exact engineering and painstakingly precise paint-jobs in this premier head-to-head motorcycle match-up. You’ll even have the opportunity to meet the artists, get their autographs, take pictures, and then voice your opinion to help decide the winner!

 

 

New Motorcycle and Bicycle App that could save your life – V-Twin Life

In most accidents between a car and a bike, drivers tend to say the same thing: They just didn’t see the cyclist until it was too late. A new app aims to help by automatically warning drivers several seconds before a bike is visible. Using the ubiquity of smartphones, the app creates a vehicle-to-vehicle communication network between cars, bicycles, and motorcycles on the road.

“You’ve probably had the experience that you’re driving your car, and all of the sudden a motorcycle passes you on the left, fast,” says Pere Margalef, one of the designers of the new BikeShieldApp. “You think if you’d just decided to change lanes, you would have hit this guy. So I thought, what if somehow before I even see him, I know that he’s coming?”

Other companies are also developing technology for communication between vehicles, but those rely on adding new hardware, like sensors, to both cars and bikes. “It’s too complicated,” Margalef says. “I know it will happen eventually–in 10 years, cars may be driving themselves and preventing accidents. But that’s too late. I’m riding my bike and motorcycle now, and I want to fix the problem now.”

Since smartphones have the technology necessary to track vehicles, the designers decided to make an app. The app uses GPS to follow each vehicle, and when any two vehicles are close enough that an accident could happen, the app sends a notification to the driver. It can be set to a simple sound effect, or can give a voiced warning that, for example, a bike is approaching on the right. The warning comes five to ten seconds before you actually see a bicycle or motorcycle.

Cyclists won’t get a warning, since it can be less safe to listen to messages while riding, and because someone on a bike doesn’t have the same speed or ability to respond as a car. But they can use the app in other ways, including to get a recommendation for the safest route based on the number of people on the road who happen to also have the app.

The biggest challenge will be getting enough people to use the app that it can truly protect those on the road. To help gain adoption, the app is free, and the designers hope to use tightly knit bike and motorcycle communities to reach out to friends who drive.

“When I bought my motorcycle, all my friends were freaking out, saying, ‘You’re going to kill yourself, don’t do this,'” explains Margalef. “So now I can say I found a solution to keep me safe. If everyone who rides a bike or motorcycle shares it with 10 people, that’s one way for car drivers to start using it.”

The designers also plan to work with car insurance companies to integrate the technology into their own apps, and ultimately hopes to build it into cars–either through technology like Apple’s new CarPlay, or by working directly with manufacturers. They also hope to integrate the function into navigation apps like Waze and Google Maps, so drivers will have it without downloading anything new.

“No one wants to be in an accident,” says Margalef. “But some drivers might not take the time to download the app, so we also want to integrate it by default.”

The “I didn’t see him coming” excuse won’t hold if the BikeShield app becomes widely used. BikeShieldApp will be available in the App Store and Google Play Store on September 12.

(Repost from FastCoExist.com)

Harley-Davidson recall: 2014 Dyna Low Rider motorcycles – V-Twin Life

Harley-Davidson 2014 Dyna Low Rider Recall

Harley-Davidson 2014 Dyna Low Rider Recall

Last month, Harley-Davidson Motor Company had recalled over 66,000 of its Touring-model motorcycles due to pinched brake-line issues.  On Friday, Harley-Davidson issued yet another recall, this one for the 2014 Harley-Davidson Low Rider (FXDL).

Harley has recalled over 4,500 Dyna Low Riders built from January 6, 2014, through June 19, 2014 worldwide due to ignition-switch issues; more than 3,300 are in the USA.  Harley reports that due to engine vibration on modified Low Riders that rev over 5,600 RPM, the ignition switch can go from “on” to “accessory.”  If this occurs, the engine can shut off while moving, potentially causing a crash.  As of this writing, no crashes have been reported due to the issues of this recall.

The full defect notice goes into more detail explaining that the engine mount bracket on these models has a resonant frequency that happens around 5,800 rpm. At this point, it begins vibrating the ignition switch and can cause it to change position. The stock bikes only allow engine speeds up to 5,600 rpm, according to the report, but the company offers an option to increase the limit further.

Harley-Davidson will notify owners, and dealers will replace the engine mount bracket assembly and ignition switch knob, free of charge. The recall was expected to begin by the end of July 2014.

Owners may contact Harley-Davidson customer service at 1-800-258-2464.