Harley-Davidson’s Milwaukee-Eight V-twin is brand’s first new engine in 15 years


Harley-Davidson just took the wraps off of its first all-new motorcycle engine in roughly 15 years. The single-cam Milwaukee-Eight 107 and 114 engines will replace the motorcycle company’s twin-cam engine that debuted in 1999. The engine desperately needed to be updated, but the Milwaukee-Eight engine, which is the ninth motor in the company’s Big Twin lineage, is a promising alternative.

The benefits of Harley’s new Milwaukee-Eight engine reads like an exaggerated résumé: more power, better cooling, reduced vibration, better fuel economy, a better exhaust note, and a slimmer overall design. In other words, the new engine is better in every single way than the previous motor, says H-D. For those wondering, the new Milwaukee-Eight is not backwards compatible with older Harley motorcycles.
Harley-Davidson just took the wraps off of its first all-new motorcycle engine in roughly 15 years. The single-cam Milwaukee-Eight 107 and 114 engines will replace the motorcycle company’s twin-cam engine that debuted in 1999. The engine desperately needed to be updated, but the Milwaukee-Eight engine, which is the ninth motor in the company’s Big Twin lineage, is a promising alternative.

The benefits of Harley’s new Milwaukee-Eight engine reads like an exaggerated résumé: more power, better cooling, reduced vibration, better fuel economy, a better exhaust note, and a slimmer overall design. In other words, the new engine is better in every single way than the previous motor, says H-D. For those wondering, the new Milwaukee-Eight is not backwards compatible with older Harley motorcycles. 
The engine comes in two sizes and three different variations – the Milwaukee-Eight 107 (107 cubic inches, or 1,750cc) and Milwaukee-Eight 114 (114 cubic inches, or 1,870cc). The new engines will be used in Harley-Davidson’s touring and trike models. The smaller 107-cubic-inch engine will be utilized in the Harley-Davidson Street Glide, Road Glide, Electra Glide, Road King, and Freewheeler models. The larger 114-cubic-inch engine will power the Ultra Limited, Road Glide Ultra, and Tri Glide Ultra models.

The new engine retains the iconic 45-degree V-twin design, but ditches one cam for twice as many valves – each cylinder now has two intake valves and two exhaust valves – which is where the new moniker comes from. Thanks to a higher compression ratio, larger displacement, and the extra set of valves, Harley claims each engine produces 10-percent more torque than the motor it replaces. Despite the power increase, the new engines weigh the same as the old units, giving the motorcycles better acceleration figures and improved fuel economy, as well.
In traditional Harley fashion, the engines are mostly air-cooled, but have liquid-cooled heads, something the company introduced on its touring bikes in 2014. The twin-cooled 107 cubic-inch-engine has liquid-cooled cylinder heads for the Road Glide Ultra, Tri Glide Ultra, and Ultra Limited models. The larger, 114 cubic-inch-engine features liquid-cooled cylinder heads for the CVO Street Glide and CVO Limited models.
Harley-Davidson will launch the new engines that will be featured in the 2017 model year touring motorcycle lineup through a virtual tour of the motorcycle factory on Facebook Live, which will be a first for the company.

Advertisements

New Motorcycle and Bicycle App that could save your life – V-Twin Life

In most accidents between a car and a bike, drivers tend to say the same thing: They just didn’t see the cyclist until it was too late. A new app aims to help by automatically warning drivers several seconds before a bike is visible. Using the ubiquity of smartphones, the app creates a vehicle-to-vehicle communication network between cars, bicycles, and motorcycles on the road.

“You’ve probably had the experience that you’re driving your car, and all of the sudden a motorcycle passes you on the left, fast,” says Pere Margalef, one of the designers of the new BikeShieldApp. “You think if you’d just decided to change lanes, you would have hit this guy. So I thought, what if somehow before I even see him, I know that he’s coming?”

Other companies are also developing technology for communication between vehicles, but those rely on adding new hardware, like sensors, to both cars and bikes. “It’s too complicated,” Margalef says. “I know it will happen eventually–in 10 years, cars may be driving themselves and preventing accidents. But that’s too late. I’m riding my bike and motorcycle now, and I want to fix the problem now.”

Since smartphones have the technology necessary to track vehicles, the designers decided to make an app. The app uses GPS to follow each vehicle, and when any two vehicles are close enough that an accident could happen, the app sends a notification to the driver. It can be set to a simple sound effect, or can give a voiced warning that, for example, a bike is approaching on the right. The warning comes five to ten seconds before you actually see a bicycle or motorcycle.

Cyclists won’t get a warning, since it can be less safe to listen to messages while riding, and because someone on a bike doesn’t have the same speed or ability to respond as a car. But they can use the app in other ways, including to get a recommendation for the safest route based on the number of people on the road who happen to also have the app.

The biggest challenge will be getting enough people to use the app that it can truly protect those on the road. To help gain adoption, the app is free, and the designers hope to use tightly knit bike and motorcycle communities to reach out to friends who drive.

“When I bought my motorcycle, all my friends were freaking out, saying, ‘You’re going to kill yourself, don’t do this,'” explains Margalef. “So now I can say I found a solution to keep me safe. If everyone who rides a bike or motorcycle shares it with 10 people, that’s one way for car drivers to start using it.”

The designers also plan to work with car insurance companies to integrate the technology into their own apps, and ultimately hopes to build it into cars–either through technology like Apple’s new CarPlay, or by working directly with manufacturers. They also hope to integrate the function into navigation apps like Waze and Google Maps, so drivers will have it without downloading anything new.

“No one wants to be in an accident,” says Margalef. “But some drivers might not take the time to download the app, so we also want to integrate it by default.”

The “I didn’t see him coming” excuse won’t hold if the BikeShield app becomes widely used. BikeShieldApp will be available in the App Store and Google Play Store on September 12.

(Repost from FastCoExist.com)

Harley-Davidson recall: 2014 Dyna Low Rider motorcycles – V-Twin Life

Harley-Davidson 2014 Dyna Low Rider Recall

Harley-Davidson 2014 Dyna Low Rider Recall

Last month, Harley-Davidson Motor Company had recalled over 66,000 of its Touring-model motorcycles due to pinched brake-line issues.  On Friday, Harley-Davidson issued yet another recall, this one for the 2014 Harley-Davidson Low Rider (FXDL).

Harley has recalled over 4,500 Dyna Low Riders built from January 6, 2014, through June 19, 2014 worldwide due to ignition-switch issues; more than 3,300 are in the USA.  Harley reports that due to engine vibration on modified Low Riders that rev over 5,600 RPM, the ignition switch can go from “on” to “accessory.”  If this occurs, the engine can shut off while moving, potentially causing a crash.  As of this writing, no crashes have been reported due to the issues of this recall.

The full defect notice goes into more detail explaining that the engine mount bracket on these models has a resonant frequency that happens around 5,800 rpm. At this point, it begins vibrating the ignition switch and can cause it to change position. The stock bikes only allow engine speeds up to 5,600 rpm, according to the report, but the company offers an option to increase the limit further.

Harley-Davidson will notify owners, and dealers will replace the engine mount bracket assembly and ignition switch knob, free of charge. The recall was expected to begin by the end of July 2014.

Owners may contact Harley-Davidson customer service at 1-800-258-2464.

Harley-Davidson recalling 66,421 motorcycles!

Harley-Davidson recalling 66,421 motorcycles

DETROIT (AP) — Harley-Davidson is recalling 66,421 Touring and CVO Touring motorcycles from the 2014 model year because their front wheels can lock up without warning.

Motorcycles with anti-lock brakes built between July 1, 2013, and May 7, 2014, are included in the recall.

Harley-Davidson Inc. says the front brake line can get pinched between the fuel tank and the frame. That could cause front brake fluid pressure to increase, increasing the risk that the front wheel could lock up while riding.

The company knows of five crashes and two minor injuries related to the defect, which it discovered last fall through warranty claims.

Harley-Davidson will notify owners later this month. Dealers will replace the brake lines for free and attach straps to hold them in place.  Make sure you check to see if your new Harley is on the list before you start your trip for the summer.  Have a safe ride and we’ll see you out on the road.

Breaking News. Daytec Frames Closed Its Doors. Owner Phil Day To Join Fat Baggers Inc.

Daytec
Repost:  Sad news for the custom motorcycle industry. Daytec,
one of the leading manufacturers of aftermarket frames for American
V-Twin Motorcycles with a state-of- the-art Powder Coating
division, has closed its doors. Phil Day created Daytec back
in 1974, first building high performance exhaust systems for the
boating industry, learning about powder coating and playing around
with all types of off-road vehicles,. JJCFLThen Daytec became the
leading manufacturer of  the highest quality custom
American V-Twin motorcycle frames, building them for different
brands like Arlen Ness and West Coast Choppers, and also creating
one-off frames for professional custom builders and individuals. In
its shop of Hesperia, California the Daytec team also performed
repair and restoration of classic and vintage frames. This morning,
Jesse James who confirmed to me the closure of Daytec, advised me
that his 2 signature frames, the CFL 1 (below picture) and CFL 3
(stainless steel) will now be made again at his own facility in
Austin, Texas. The industry just lost its best source for custom
American V-Twin custom motorcycle frames. Added
01/27/2014 at 1.00 p.m. est. Gary Chipp, founder of Fat Baggers,
Inc,
 also known as FBI located in Chariton, asked me
to announce that Phil Day of Daytec will be joining the Fat
Baggers, Inc. team February 1, 2014.
“I am excited
about new product opportunities and the opportunity to have Phil
Day in our facility assisting with manufacturing and production
management” said Gary Chipp.  Mr. Day replied, “I am excited
to be here and anxious to continue the tradition of producing
quality frames. With the recent changes in the industry, I feel
there is great opportunity in applying what I have learned to FBI!”
FBI welcomes custom frame
manufacturing and powder coating services for the aftermarket
motorcycle industry.  Contact sales at 641-774-7499 or
sales@fatbaggers.com for any of your manufacturing needs. – See
more at:
http://cyrilhuzeblog.com/2014/01/27/breaking-news-daytec-frames-closed-its-doors/#sthash.2MQvRnmR.hlNAZ7Ax.dpuf
Breaking
News. Daytec Frames Closed Its Doors. Owner Phil Day To Join Fat
Baggers Inc.
.

Motorcycle Shop Special Thanks and Highlight – Lujan Motorcycles in Albuquerque,NM

When on the road you are faced with many things that can go wrong  when riding a motorcycle across country.  Not having the right tools to get you back on road can be a big bummer and not knowing the area doesn’t help either.  With Summer time in full effect people are traveling all over this great nation and one major crosstown where the I-40 and I-25 meet is Albuquerque, NM.  As we were traveling from Cali to Albuquerque heading on to Sturgis we had an issue with my bike and the good people of Lujan Motorcycles helped us out.  I wanted to give a shout out and big thank you to Chris Lujan and the crew for not only helping me out but also being top quality guys who build some killer custom rides to boot.  The shop is located in the valley right off Rio Grande Blvd and Central and if you are in the area or in need of a good repair shop then this is your place.  They can customize your ride or just give you a simple tweak, whatever you need Chris and the crew can make it happen.  Some Albuquerque family have been dealing with Lujan Motorcycles and always had solid service at good prices.  I’m glad they finally turned me onto this place.  Thanks again Chris and I’ll see you on my next stop in Albuquerque.  Hopefully we can share a beer and talk more about your builds.  Keep the rubber on the road and be safe out there.  

For more info on Lujan Motorcycles please call or click link below.

Lujan Motorcycles,

3900 Central Ave SW, Albuquerque, NM 87105

505-839-9118

http://www.LujanMotorcycles.com

https://www.facebook.com/chris.lujan.923?fref=ts

Lujan Motorcycles

Lujan Motorcycles

Lujan Shop Sign

Lujan Shop Sign

 

Lujan Motorcycles Front

Lujan Motorcycles Front